Sunday, June 22, 2008

Installing Oracle IRM Server


I have already created a post about Oracle Information Rights Management and now a quick note on how to install it. Installing Oracle Information Rights Management server is quite simple the only downside is that it will only install and run on a windows server what required me to setup a windows 2003 server in a virtual machine.


Afters download the Oracle Information Rights Management server from the oracle website. To be able to install the server you have to have a Oracle database or a Microsoft SQL database running. I installed a Oracle database for this purpose.

One other thing to consider is that you will need a specific database user which Oracle IRM will be using to connect to the database.

Using Oracle, the rights required by the license server during installation are:
CREATE, UPDATE, ALTER and DROP TABLE and create and modify CONSTRAINTs
CREATE and DROP SEQUENCE
CREATE and DROP INDEX
CREATE and DROP PROCEDURE
CREATE and DROP FUNCTION
CREATE and DROP PACKAGE


When the installation is done you will have to grant rights for:
INSERT, UPDATE, SELECT, DELETE records
EXECUTE PROCEDURE and EXECUTE FUNCTION


The installation is a real windows installation where you will be asked to give a superuser his password and to select the oracle database datasource. After this is done you can click a couple of times next and you have a running IRM server.


To verify that the installation is a success you can try to connect with a client to the server, however if you have this not running you can do a “web ping”. Lets say your Oracle Information Rights Management server is running on irm01.internal.terminalcult.org you can request the website http:// irm01.internal.terminalcult.org:80 and you will get a response something similar like this:


[ABC license server@licsvr,4.1 release 05 build 0, 27 dec 2005 11:24:21 utc]

This ping test verifies two factors: that the server is responsive, and that it can communicate with its database. The database test is useful in deployments where the database is remote from the license server, and perhaps beyond a firewall that might impact connectivity.

If unsuccessful, a standard HTTP error indicates which of those factors is not true.

The license server supports a second HTTP test request that, if successful, verifies that the license server can access and return data from its database. The second request is:

http://smlicense.abc.com:80/check

Again, you see a status string or a standard HTTP error. The reason for supporting two HTTP tests is that the ping test is as lightweight as possible, whereas the check test requires a little additional processing. The ping test might be used for periodic checking, whereas the check test is suitable for less frequent checking.

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