Monday, October 31, 2016

Oracle Linux - inspect hardware for configuration management database

In many cases the ideal world and the real world are miles apart. In an ideal world every system ever put into the datacenter is entered into a configuration management database and you will be able to find out with the click of a button what specific configuration is done to a system, what its use is and what hardware components it is using. As second part of the ideal world is that all your hardware for your compute farm is made of exactly the same hardware. However, reality is grim and in general configuration management database and asset management databases are not always as up to date as one would like.

When using Oracle Enterprise Manager and placing all operating systems under the management umbrella of Oracle Enterprise Manager you will already start to get the needed input for a unified and central database where you can look up a lot of the specification of a system. However, Oracle Enterprise Manager is build around the database, management of (Oracle) applications is added at a later stage just like the management of operating systems. For non-Oracle hardware the hardware inspect is also not as deep as one would like sometimes.

However, it can be vital to have a more in depth insight in the hardware that is used in a system. For example if you want to understand how your landscape is build up from an hardware point of view. A Linux tool that might be able to help you with that is lshw which will give you with a single command an overview of the hardware present in your system.

The Oracle YUM repository has the needed packages for lshw which makes the installation of lshw extremely easy as you can use the yum command for the installation as shown below;

yum install lshw

When using lshw in a standard mode you will get a standard user friendly view of the hardware as shown below. Interesting to note, the below is running on an Oracle Linux instance on the Oracle Compute cloud so you will some interesting insights into the inner workings of the Oracle Compute cloud while reading through the below output. When running this on physical hardware the output will look a bit different and more realistic.

[root@testbox09 ~]# lshw
testbox09
    description: Computer
    product: HVM domU
    vendor: Xen
    version: 4.3.1OVM
    serial: ffc59abb-f496-4819-8d0c-a6fad4334391
    width: 64 bits
    capabilities: smbios-2.4 dmi-2.4 vsyscall32
    configuration: boot=normal uuid=FFC59ABB-F496-4819-8D0C-A6FAD4334391
  *-core
       description: Motherboard
       physical id: 0
     *-firmware:0
          description: BIOS
          vendor: Xen
          physical id: 0
          version: 4.3.1OVM
          date: 11/05/2015
          size: 96KiB
          capabilities: pci edd
     *-cpu:0
          description: CPU
          product: Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E5-2690 v2 @ 3.00GHz
          vendor: Intel Corp.
          vendor_id: GenuineIntel
          physical id: 1
          bus info: cpu@0
          slot: CPU 1
          size: 2993MHz
          capacity: 2993MHz
          width: 64 bits
          capabilities: fpu fpu_exception wp vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge mca cmov pat pse36 clflush mmx fxsr sse sse2 ht syscall nx rdtscp x86-64 constant_tsc rep_good nopl eagerfpu pni pclmulqdq ssse3 cx16 pcid sse4_1 sse4_2 x2apic popcnt tsc_deadline_timer aes xsave avx f16c rdrand hypervisor lahf_lm xsaveopt fsgsbase smep erms
     *-cpu:1
          description: CPU
          vendor: Intel
          physical id: 2
          bus info: cpu@1
          slot: CPU 2
          size: 2993MHz
          capacity: 2993MHz
     *-memory:0
          description: System Memory
          physical id: 3
          capacity: 3584MiB
        *-bank:0
             description: DIMM RAM
             physical id: 0
             slot: DIMM 0
             size: 7680MiB
             width: 64 bits
        *-bank:1
             description: DIMM RAM
             physical id: 1
             slot: DIMM 0
             size: 7680MiB
             width: 64 bits
     *-firmware:1
          description: BIOS
          vendor: Xen
          physical id: 4
          version: 4.3.1OVM
          date: 11/05/2015
          size: 96KiB
          capabilities: pci edd
     *-cpu:2
          description: CPU
          vendor: Intel
          physical id: 5
          bus info: cpu@2
          slot: CPU 1
          size: 2993MHz
          capacity: 2993MHz
     *-cpu:3
          description: CPU
          vendor: Intel
          physical id: 6
          bus info: cpu@3
          slot: CPU 2
          size: 2993MHz
          capacity: 2993MHz
     *-memory:1
          description: System Memory
          physical id: 7
          capacity: 3584MiB
     *-memory:2 UNCLAIMED
          physical id: 8
     *-memory:3 UNCLAIMED
          physical id: 9
     *-pci
          description: Host bridge
          product: 440FX - 82441FX PMC [Natoma]
          vendor: Intel Corporation
          physical id: 100
          bus info: pci@0000:00:00.0
          version: 02
          width: 32 bits
          clock: 33MHz
        *-isa
             description: ISA bridge
             product: 82371SB PIIX3 ISA [Natoma/Triton II]
             vendor: Intel Corporation
             physical id: 1
             bus info: pci@0000:00:01.0
             version: 00
             width: 32 bits
             clock: 33MHz
             capabilities: isa bus_master
             configuration: latency=0
        *-ide
             description: IDE interface
             product: 82371SB PIIX3 IDE [Natoma/Triton II]
             vendor: Intel Corporation
             physical id: 1.1
             bus info: pci@0000:00:01.1
             version: 00
             width: 32 bits
             clock: 33MHz
             capabilities: ide bus_master
             configuration: driver=ata_piix latency=64
             resources: irq:0 ioport:1f0(size=8) ioport:3f6 ioport:170(size=8) ioport:376 ioport:c140(size=16)
        *-bridge UNCLAIMED
             description: Bridge
             product: 82371AB/EB/MB PIIX4 ACPI
             vendor: Intel Corporation
             physical id: 1.3
             bus info: pci@0000:00:01.3
             version: 01
             width: 32 bits
             clock: 33MHz
             capabilities: bridge bus_master
             configuration: latency=0
        *-display UNCLAIMED
             description: VGA compatible controller
             product: GD 5446
             vendor: Cirrus Logic
             physical id: 2
             bus info: pci@0000:00:02.0
             version: 00
             width: 32 bits
             clock: 33MHz
             capabilities: vga_controller bus_master
             configuration: latency=0
             resources: memory:f0000000-f1ffffff memory:f3020000-f3020fff
        *-generic
             description: Unassigned class
             product: Xen Platform Device
             vendor: XenSource, Inc.
             physical id: 3
             bus info: pci@0000:00:03.0
             version: 01
             width: 32 bits
             clock: 33MHz
             capabilities: bus_master
             configuration: driver=xen-platform-pci latency=0
             resources: irq:28 ioport:c000(size=256) memory:f2000000-f2ffffff
  *-network
       description: Ethernet interface
       physical id: 1
       logical name: eth0
       serial: c6:b0:ed:00:52:16
       capabilities: ethernet physical
       configuration: broadcast=yes driver=vif ip=10.196.73.178 link=yes multicast=yes
[root@testbox09 ~]#

Even though the above is interesting, it is not helping in building a unified database containing the physical hardware of your servers. However, lshw has some more options that can be used as shown below;

[root@testbox09 ~]# lshw --help
Hardware Lister (lshw) - B.02.17
usage: lshw [-format] [-options ...]
       lshw -version

        -version        print program version (B.02.17)

format can be
        -html           output hardware tree as HTML
        -xml            output hardware tree as XML
        -short          output hardware paths
        -businfo        output bus information

options can be
        -dump OUTFILE   save hardware tree to a file
        -class CLASS    only show a certain class of hardware
        -C CLASS        same as '-class CLASS'
        -c CLASS        same as '-class CLASS'
        -disable TEST   disable a test (like pci, isapnp, cpuid, etc. )
        -enable TEST    enable a test (like pci, isapnp, cpuid, etc. )
        -quiet          don't display status
        -sanitize       sanitize output (remove sensitive information like serial numbers, etc.)
        -numeric        output numeric IDs (for PCI, USB, etc.)

[root@testbox09 ~]#

The most interesting to note from the above is the xml option. This means you can have the above output in an xml format. We can use the xml format option in a custom check within Oracle Enterprise Manager and instruct the agent deployed on Oracle Linux to use the xml output from lshw as input for Oracle Enterprise Manager and so automatically maintain a hardware configuration management database in Oracle Enterprise Manager without the need to undertake manual actions.

For those who want to check the xml output, you can print it to screen or save it to a file using the below command;

[root@testbox09 ~]#
[root@testbox09 ~]# lshw -xml >> /tmp/lshw.xml
[root@testbox09 ~]# ls -la /tmp/lshw.xml
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 12151 Oct 31 14:29 /tmp/lshw.xml
[root@testbox09 ~]#
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